Home Page

Awards

Biographies

Discography

Feedback

Filmography

Lyrics

Recollections

Reference

Reflections

Search

Slide Shows

Special Features

 

UNC

Videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle Sundin

Naples, Texas, USA. October 6, 2006

 

Other work by Michelle Sundin:

Stan Jones

Rex Allen

 

Bob Nolan

            I never met Bob Nolan so there are no personal recollections of the man to share with whomever reads these words.  Those lucky enough to meet and maybe even get to know him on some level, are the ones who have been given an extra special gift. All I can offer are my own cherished and indelible memories - acquired in my own search to find out about a writer who could say more in a few sentences, than I could in many pages. It is BECAUSE of Bob Nolan, I have these memories. And while he’ll never know it, he changed my life.
            It really started with Bill Jacobson and Mary Rogers in Colorado, and their wonderful magazine about the Sons of the Pioneers.  And all the Pioneer and other Western music they shared with me. They also introduced me to the unforgettable Bill Wiley, probably one of Bob Nolan and the Sons of the Pioneers’ biggest fans.  Then on to Rex Allen, who in turn, spoke a few kind words to Roy Rogers and thus enabled me to interview him one morning in the early 1990’s at the Roy and Dale Museum in Victorville.  We chatted about the beginnings of the Pioneers and his friendship with Bob Nolan and he took my arm and led me on a private tour of the museum.  I knew as we walked and talked, that he had told the stories many times over the years, but he made them seem special and his friendship with Nolan come alive. Even after nearly 60 years, he spoke so well and admiringly of Nolan as a man and a songwriter.
            Rex told of his Nolan friendship and of the tribute held at his ranch in southern California.  And during a visit to his home in Sonoita, sang me a verse of 'Cottage in the Clouds' - a Nolan/Perryman collaboration.  And again thru Rex, I spoke with Snuff Garrett and heard his funny and insightful stories during a telephone call and later, at the Nolan tribute in Tucson.  And as the years passed, and intrinsically interwoven with my research, the Reinsmen appeared.  Ah, what a talented and generous group of gentlemen - one and all.  Whenever I hear a Bob Nolan song, I immediately think of those guys and am thankful they recorded so many - so well.   And Patsy Montana - telling of how she  had a crush on Bob Nolan when she was a young woman and how decades later volunteered to bring him an award from Nashville that he didn’t want to accept in person.  And how she was so surprised to find him in a t-shirt and bib overalls working in his garden when he accepted it.  The twinkle in her eye and laughter in her voice as she told the story and showed the photos she took - pure Patsy. 

 

Patsy Montana photo to Michelle

 

            And the kindness of Ken Carson - evidenced in his warm letter - I felt so honored!  And Bob Morgan, who shared his memories and music. And Hi Busse, whose stories were legendary. And Ranger Doug, the idol my post-youth. And Elizabeth McDonald, who tirelessly brought together so many pieces of puzzle of Nolan's birth and early life and disproved so many supposed 'facts'... So many kind people who just wanted to talk about and share what impact Nolan had on their lives.  So many of them are now gone...
            Of course, the story doesn’t end there, although there certainly are enough warm thoughts already to last me a lifetime.  For the past few years I’ve been involved with raising horses, and for a time, helped with some ‘dude’ rides at the base of the Cascades in Oregon.  Out on the trail, I would invariably think of a Nolan song while riding thru the woods or along a cool, clear stream.  And when the sun would shine thru the trees.  Or after a rain when the mist would be rising.  And now, in the Piney Woods of Texas, I again see and feel Bob Nolan in the wind and heat.  And as corny as it sounds, ‘The Mystery of His Way’, and ‘The Wonder of It All’ seem even more alive.
            Each memory is like a piece of a quilt - my Bob Nolan quilt.  It’ll never be finished, but it’s been quite a sewing project with each little patch a moment in time I can’t and hopefully won’t ever forget.

 

1941

 

Needlecraft by Michelle