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            Have you ever seen a tumbleweed go racing across the desert and hit a fence? 

It’s just that sound. That one note -

"Dri-fting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds."

If you close your eyes, that’s what you hear when you see a tumbleweed hit a fence - till it gets on the other side

(Bob Nolan)

 

               

Tumbling Tumble Weeds

original version

(Bob Nolan)

 

Days may be dreary, still I’m not weary,

My heart needs no consoling.

At each break of dawn, you’ll find that I’ve gone

Like old tumbleweeds, I’m rolling.

 

See them tumbling down,

Pledging their love to the ground,

Lonely but free I’ll be found

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

Cares of the past are behind,

Nowhere to go, but I’ll find

Just where the trail will wind,

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

I know when night has gone

That a new world’s born at dawn.

I’ll keep rolling along,

Deep in my heart is a song,

Here on the range I belong,

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

(Sunset Music, 1934)

 

Chords courtesy of Carlos Fiorelli

Recordings by the Sons of the Pioneers

TRANSCRIPTIONS

 

Rather than retell the story of "Tumbling Tumbleweeds", we have listed the best essays and interviews for your reading enjoyment. We have included Bob's own words whenever possible.

 

The Sad History of Tumbling Tumbleweeds (by Laurence Zwisohn)

Tumbling Tumbleweeds: Evolution of a Western Standard (by Lawrence Hopper)

Nolan v Williamson court case

Two Different Verses or Lead-ins (by Laurence Zwisohn)

Copyrighting Tumbling Tumbleweeds (in Bob's words)

Movie, "Tumbling Tumbleweeds"

Films featuring "Tumbling Tumbleweeds"

Recordings (audio) of "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" by various groups.

Photo Gallery

Tune Dex

 

 From "Tumbling Leaves to Tumbling Tumbleweeds" in Bob Nolan's words:

       “The song itself - the melody - had different lyrics altogether and I don’t know if it was quite by an accident that we – somebody - thought of Tumbling Tumbleweeds. I didn’t at the time. The announcer at KFWB said, ‘Why don’t you... They keep requesting this Tumbling Weeds song.’ …the song at the time was Tumbling Leaves and … I’d say about 7 out of 10 requests for the song came in [for] Tumbling Weeds, see, so Harry Hall  said, ‘Why don’t you change the lyrics and make it Tumbling Weeds? Tumbling Tumbleweeds.’

        “Just the same melody except that it didn’t have that tilted note in the latter part. It went da da da da da da da da da dum. And once I used the tumbleweed at the end of the phrase, I had to put in that tilt – ta-dum – where it hits the snag. Da da da da da da da da da dum ta dum." (Bob Nolan in a radio interview on January 9, 1972) Hear that part of the interview in Bob Nolan's words.

 


 

Various quotations from Bob Nolan

 

        “Have you ever seen a tumbleweed go racing across the desert and hit a fence? It’s just that sound. If you close your eyes, that’s what you see - what you hear - with that one note is what you see when you see a tumbleweed hit a fence. It goes tumbling along, ta da da da da da bump ta da till it gets on the other side, see.” (Bob Nolan, in a taped conversation, courtesy of Richard  Goodman.) The new song, Tumbling Tumbleweeds, was published in May of 1934 by Sunset Music in Los Angeles.

 

           "It seems to me that it’s always been man’s nature to wander over the face of the earth in search of food, in search of wealth, and in search of adventure. The old west brought many, many men, torn from the roots of their eastern homes to travel the wide open spaces in search of these illusive things. And today, it seems to me, these same men live on, drifting and roaming in the spirit of tumbling tumbleweeds." (Bob Nolan in his introduction to Teleways Transcription #26)

 

        When asked what he considered a turning point in his career, Bob answered, “When Rudy Vallee first sang my Tumbling Tumbleweeds on his program in 1933." (Calin Coburn Collection Volume 1, #184)

 


 

Copyright

NOLAN: I didn’t copyright it until 1934 but I wrote it in 1930.
GRIFFIS: Tumbling Tumbleweeds?
NOLAN: Tumbling Tumbling Leaves. The Tumbling Leaves. I’m sorry. That was the title.
GRIFFIS: That was in 1930.
NOLAN: Yeah.
GRIFFIS: But then you copyright Tumbling Tumbleweeds in 1934?
NOLAN: Yeah.
GRIFFIS: Now was it written as a poem or did it have music with it?
NOLAN: Yes. I wrote Tumbling Leaves, words and music. Let’s see. I never even thought of making it Tumbling Tumbleweeds, but Tumbling Leaves. I was just sitting in my little cottage out in West Los Angeles. My girl, Mickey, was working at the Old Soldier’s Home and I was working up in the hills in Bel Air Country Club, caddying. It was on a Sunday afternoon when I started to work on this song and Mickey was in the kitchen. Oh, she was going to do a cuisine for our Sunday evening dinner. That’s where it was written – out in West Los Angeles sometime in the year 1930. I think that was the same time of the year that the boys were trying to get me to come back….
GRIFFIS: Tumbling Leaves would have the same melody that you …?
NOLAN: Same melody. Only one note was changed. Instead of drifting along with the tumbling leaves, it was drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds. Well, I had to do something if I was going to change it from leaves to tumbleweeds but I had to because everybody that requested the doggone song, see we sang it and, My God, the requests coming in for Tumbling Leaves, see. “Sing that Tumbling Weeds song.” I didn’t think of it first. Our damn engineer thought of it. Why don’t you change it to Tumbling Tumbleweeds?
GRIFFIS: Did you ever copyright Tumbling Leaves? Did you ever think of copyrighting it?
NOLAN: No, no. It wasn’t really copyrighted until 1934.
GRIFFIS: As Tumbling Tumbleweeds.
NOLAN: M-hmm.

 

(From Ken Griffis' Interview of Bob Nolan on January 12, 1972)

 


 

 The different verses:

           Most Sons of the Pioneers fans who have read Ken Griffis’ book, Hear My Song, are familiar with the story of how Tumbling Tumbleweeds came to be written. In the fall of 1932, Bob Nolan wrote a poem titled Tumbling Leaves. Later Bob added music and the Sons of the Pioneers began singing the song on their radio broadcasts. Since Tumbling Leaves didn’t have a western lyric, the words were changed slightly to Tumbling Tumbleweeds. The song became one of the Pioneers’ most requested numbers and soon became their theme song.

          A few months ago, Bob Nolan mentioned to Ken Griffis that he hadn’t written the opening verse to the song. That verse which begins, I’m a rovin’ cowboy, ridin’ all day long… has long been thought to be from the pen of Nolan. In truth, his original verse had a rather short life and has been dwelling in obscurity for the past forty-four years.

          Tumbling Tumbleweeds was originally published by Sunset Music, a small, local Los Angeles purchase in May 1934. The song met with success and the publishing rights were purchased by the larger Sam fox Publishing Company, based in Cleveland. The nationally distributed edition of the song appeared in July 1934, only seven weeks after the original edition was published in Los Angeles. However, when the Fox edition appeared, a new verse had been inserted.

 

I’m a rovin’ cowboy, ridin’ all day long.

Tumbleweeds around me sing their lonely song.

Nights underneath a prairie moon,

I ride alone and sing a tune.

 

          Nolan isn’t particularly fond of this verse, saying it is rather artificial and a Tin Pan Alley conception of a western lyric. Neither Bob nor anyone else knows who wrote the revised verse. Nonetheless, the second verse is the one the Pioneers sang on their two Decca recordings of the song.

          Just to verify that the Sunset verse was the one Bob had written, I took it over to him and asked him if it was his. Bob took out his guitar, picked out the melody and sang the lyrics in a rather dramatic fashion. It had been years since he had seen his original verse, and he carefully took his time about playing and singing it. When he finished, Bob put his guitar down and said he still didn’t know why the publishers had changed it. Even after all these years he still prefers his original verse to the substitution.

 

Days may be dreary

Still I’m not weary.

My heart needs no consoling.

At each break of dawn

You’ll find that I’ve gone

Like old tumbleweeds, I'm rolling.

 

(Larry Zwisohn, Pioneer News 1, No. 2. (May-June 1978) see the original verse in 1934.

 

         There is at least one printing error in the Sunset Music copy of the original verse. “For the only time while I knew him, Bob went to another room and came back with a guitar. He sat down, strummed the guitar and sang his original verse. At one point he hit a bad chord, looked at the sheet music, played the same bad chord a second time, smiled and said, ‘They’ve got a mistake here.’ He finished singing the verse, looked at me and said he still didn’t know why they had changed it” (Zwisohn, Laurence"  in a letter to EM on June 29, 1999.)

 


 

Western Movie, Tumbling Tumbleweeds, starts Autry on his illustrious career:

        One of Gene’s (Autry) first million-selling records was his superb rendition of the Pioneer’s theme song, “Tumbling Tumbleweeds”, written by Bob Nolan. It became the title of the first Autry musical western for Republic Pictures in mid-1935, and its success prompted Gene to ask on more than one occasion the renowned cowboy poet for another hit song along the same lines. “Sure, Gene,” Nolan would always respond from his customary perch in the cafe he frequented. “I’m working on a new song just for you.” Somehow, that promised song which would have undoubtedly been a classic was never delivered, but Gene did sing Bob’s “Cool Water”…. (John Guyot Smith, 1997)

 


 

The Sad History of Tumbling Tumbleweeds (by Laurence Zwisohn)

The publishing history of Tumbling Tumbleweeds illustrates how many songwriters have been taken advantage of by music publishers due to their lack of business expertise.

The song Tumbling Tumbleweeds began as a poem titled Tumbling Leaves which Bob Nolan wrote on an autumn day in 1932. Around that same time Bob Nolan joined a local Los Angeles area country music group called The Rocky Mountaineers where he sang duets with Roy Rogers (then known by his original name of Len Slye).

Late in 1933 the Pioneer Trio (which became the Sons of the Pioneers) was formed by Roy Rogers, Bob Nolan and Tim Spencer. A short time later they were signed as staff singers on radio station KFWB in Hollywood. By this time Bob Nolan had added music to Tumbling Leaves and the trio began singing the song on some of their radio appearances. The trio’s performances of Tumbling Leaves went over well with their audiences and they began receiving letters asking them to repeat the song. A number of these requests asked for the song about the “tumbling weeds”. Since the Pioneer Trio’s repertoire was primarily built around western songs Bob Nolan saw the logic of making a few changes to his song and turning it into Tumbling Tumbleweeds. The Pioneer Trio’s growing popularity on KFWB led to their being given a program of their own and, to no one’s surprise, they chose Tumbling Tumbleweeds as their theme song.

Sheet music sales had long been an important source of income for both songwriters and music publishers and one of the biggest outlets for sheet music sales was at the 5 & 10 cent chain stores such as Woolworth’s and Newberry’s. The owner of the sheet music concession at Newberry’s in Los Angeles who also operated Sunset Music, a small music publishing company, recognized the growing popularity of Tumbling Tumbleweeds and in May 1934 he obtained the publishing rights to the song from Bob Nolan.

Within six weeks of the time Tumbling Tumbleweeds was published by Sunset Music the company was contacted by the larger Sam Fox Music which purchased the song’s publishing rights with the knowledge and approval of Bob Nolan. Sam Fox Music quickly republished the song but their sheet music edition dropped Bob Nolan’s original opening verse and replaced it with a verse written by one of their staff writers. Apparently the publisher felt the original verse didn't have a strong enough western feel. This change was made without Bob Nolan’s knowledge or permission.

In 1946 Sam Fox Music encountered financial difficulties which led to their selling the publishing rights to the songs Tumbling Tumbleweeds and I’ll Be Seeing You (written by Sammy Fain and Irving Kahal) to Williamson Music which was owned by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II.

Before the formation of BMI (Broadcast Music Inc.) in 1940 music licensing in the United States was dominated by ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers). ASCAP restricted its membership which resulted in few writers of western songs, jazz, blues, hillbilly and other styles of music being allowed to join the society. Although ASCAP membership was restricted ASCAP affiliated music publishers were never reluctant to obtain the rights to any song that was likely to generate sales and revenue. Although they might publish a song by a non-ASCAP member the songwriters themselves weren’t allowed to participate in all the sources of music income that were available to ASCAP members.

In 1959 Bob Nolan asked his attorney to review his finances and the status of his copyrights. This led to the discovery that for many years he had been receiving only a small portion of the income he was entitled to from Tumbling Tumbleweeds. Unable to reach a settlement with Williamson Music a lawsuit was brought against the publisher. The court case, which was upheld on appeal, ruled against Williamson Music. Bob Nolan was awarded a financial settlement going back seven years (the maximum period allowed by the law) however, his request to have the copyright returned to him was denied and the song remained with Williamson Music.

When Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI) was formed in 1940 they took a broad-minded approach which welcomed all songwriters into their organization. Bob Nolan and Tim Spencer were under contract to American Music and they along with American Music were among the earliest to join BMI. As a result all of Bob Nolan’s songs were affiliated with BMI with the exception of Tumbling Tumbleweeds which remained with Williamson Music, an ASCAP affiliate that didn’t even form a BMI publishing company until sometime in the 1990s.

Although there have been many recent changes in the United States copyright law songwriters or their estates are permitted to exercise their right to get back the American publishing rights to a song at the end of the 56th year of a copyright. Bob Nolan’s widow chose to do this by forming Music of the West, a BMI affiliated publishing company. The first of Bob Nolan’s songs to come up for its 56-year renewal was Tumbling Tumbleweeds. As required by law Williamson Music was notified that Mrs. Nolan planned to exercise her right to renew the copyright. By placing the song with Music of the West, a BMI affiliate, it would finally be possible for Bob Nolan’s estate to begin receiving a greater measure of income from Tumbling Tumbleweeds.

BMI pays higher income to those songs that have received over a million performances. Bob Nolan’s song Cool Water had long since qualified as a million performance song and although Tumbling Tumbleweeds had been in an ASCAP company since 1946 there was no question it also belonged in that category. As soon as the song was transferred to Music of the West BMI qualified Tumbling Tumbleweeds as a million-performance song which further increased its earning ability.

         There is no way to estimate the amount of income Bob Nolan lost from Tumbling Tumbleweeds over the decades due to accounting practices and to the many years the song remained in an ASCAP catalog while Bob Nolan was a BMI member. (Laurence Zwisohn for this website, October, 2002)


 

TUMBLING TUMBLEWEEDS: Evolution of a Western Standard by Lawrence Hopper ©2008

 

It didn’t start out to be a western classic but within twenty years Tumbling Tumbleweeds was well down the trail to that goal. Originally conceived as a song of loneliness, equivocation and determination it evolved through misunderstanding and external manipulation into a fundamental evocation of the iconic American cowboy working the range and at one with his environment.  Return with us now to those early days when Depression was upon the land, jobs were scarce, becoming scarcer, and few could see any light in the dust storm of financial collapse except a young man with “a song in his heart.” 

Bob Nolan arrived in Los Angeles from Tucson at about the same time Wall Street laid its egg.  He worked as a lifeguard, caddy, a cook in Los Angeles, performer in a Chautauqua tent show, and on the boardwalk at Santa Monica while rooming on Grand Avenue in Los Angeles.  According to Bob’s statements contained in Nolan v. Williamson Music and et al. (1969) he had written Tumbling Tumbleweeds, or its predecessor Tumbling Leaves, as early as 1929. Since it was Bob’s habit to be “writing” several songs at a time in his mind before committing them to paper it is a safe assumption that he was speaking figuratively. 

The evolution from mind to hard copy manifests in the “book” of the O-Bar-O Cowboys. The O-Bar-O Cowboys were made up of Len Slye (Roy Rogers), Tim Spencer, Bill “Slumber” Nicholls, “Cactus Mac” MacPeters and a fellow known only as “Cyclone.”  They formed after Bob had left the Rocky Mountaineers, returning to better pay as a caddy at the Bel Air Country Club. 

The typed lyric sheets used by the O-Bar-O Cowboys for their ill-advised summer 1933 tour of the southwest contained three indicative pieces of evidence to possible dating of Tumbling Leaves.

The first was an otherwise blank sheet with Tumbling Leaves written upon it inserted into the book. Secondly there was a four line verse written by Bob on the reverse of the lyric sheet for Goin’ Back to Texas:

 

Time keeps rolling along

Why should I care if I’m wrong

Here in my heart is a song

Drifting along with the tumbling leaves.

           

            Thirdly, there was the lyric sheet of the Rocky Mountaineers theme song. All suggesting that other lyric sheets making up the book were from the earlier 1932 period when Len, Tim, Slumber and Bob were in the Mountaineers together.

            In a conversation with Roy Rogers discussing his time with Benny Nawahi’s International Cowboys just prior to the formation of the O-Bar-O Cowboys he mentioned the Long Beach earthquake, which occurred just as the group was beginning their act at the Warner Theatre at 5:45pm March 10, 1933.  Roy said, “They had just begun to sing Tumbling Tumbleweeds, or Tumbling Leaves as it was known at the time when the chandelier shook.”

            The song of loneliness and determination lay dormant during the O-Bar-O Cowboys tour and resurfaced when Len gathered together Tim Spencer and Bob Nolan to form a trio working with Jack and His Texas Outlaws on KFWB. Tumbling Leaves proved popular with listeners and at public appearances but a problem developed. Requesters, confusing the words, asked for “that tumbling weed song,” or “tumbleweed song.”  At the suggestion of Harry Hall, the KFWB announcer who would rename the Pioneer Trio the Sons of the Pioneers the title officially became Tumbling Tumbleweeds and Bob adjusted the melody to accommodate the two extra syllables.

            By May 25, 1934 after the Sons of the Pioneers were established, Tumbling Tumbleweeds was copyright and published by Sunset Music, a California business owned by Harry Walker.  This was under the usual publisher – writer terms whereby each split the royalty 50-50 – half for the publisher and half for the songwriter. Strangely the published music was entitled on each page and the cover as Tumbling Tumble Weeds (three words).

            At this point Harry Hall again enters the scene becoming part of a new “better” publishing deal with Sam Fox Music of Cleveland.  Sam Fox was a large publishing house whose greater distribution outclassed Harry Walker’s local operation.  On July 11, 1934 the publishing contract was, by mutual consent, assigned to Sam Fox with a number of changes.

            First, the title was reduced to two words – Tumbling Tumbleweeds.

            Second, Bob’s original introduction was removed and replaced by the familiar opening we know today by an arranger at Sam Fox much to Bob’s immediate consternation.

            Third, there were some sophisticated chord changes indicated in the bridge, and...

            Fourth, the royalty contract was changed.  Sam Fox would get their half as publishers with Bob Nolan, Harry Walker and Harry Hall splitting the composer’s share.

 

            The first matter presented no problems. The second, the most significant, was soon overlooked when the Sons of the Pioneers preferred the opening and Bob was happy with the royalties it produced. The significance of this change was how it solidified the song irrefutably as a part of the western genre.  The substitution of the words “tumbleweeds” for “leaves” didn’t really alter the lonesome stubbornness and determination of the persona despite the additional use of the word “range” to replace “heart.”  It was the introduction with “roamin’ cowboy,” “prairie moon,” “riding along” which set the song in its place in music history.

            The chord changes making up the third item were ignored. The Sons of the Pioneers and most musicians since preferred a simpler chord structure originally used by Bob.

            Who had made the change in the verse and the chord notations on the bridge has remained a mystery.  To my mind the sophisticated new chords suggested a classically trained musician “fine-tuning” the piece. I further thought it would be someone who could write lyrics. Lacking hard evidence in the form of signed lead sheets, memoranda, or entries in the Sam Fox ledgers I can only propose a likely suspect.  Louis De Francesca.

            Louis De Francesca was a European trained musician among the many arriving in Hollywood to supply music and arrangements for the silent and then sound films.  He was hired by Sam Fox to augment the Fox Studios’ (no relationship) music department and he became a part of the Sam Fox organization writing cues and composing music for live and animated shorts including newsreels like The March of Time and sports films. Most of his music was collected into several multi-volume music catalogs published by Sam Fox for use in the film industry.  The few lyrics he wrote were used in 1933 and 1934 for the films Cavalcade and Carolina but some were either cut in favor of an instrumental presentation or issued as sheet music in conjunction with the film but not heard in the completed picture.

            As to the fourth matter, the royalty split, it would be settled in May of 1961 during the renewal period of the song copyright.  Harry Hall’s interest had expired and Bob obtained Harry Walker’s interest regaining, on paper at least, the proper portion of his royalty as songwriter.

            Although there is no visible difference between the Sam Fox and Williamson Music versions of Tumbling Tumbleweeds the impact of the assignment to Williamson Music in March of 1960 by Sam Fox would lead Bob Nolan to the courts in a struggle over rights, royalties and possible fraud.  The public was unaware because they had the song on records, in songbooks, in glee club performances, on transcriptions and in the movies.

            The Standard Radio Transcriptions of 1934 – 35 distributed to radio stations around the country, and the Charles Starrett Columbia westerns between 1937 and 1941 did the most to implant Tumbling Tumbleweeds in the public consciousness since they used the song as the opening and closing themes.

            So it was that a song in the heart of a lonely writer became an instantly recognizable song in the hearts of millions and a trademark of the American West.

 

Reconstruction of the original poem:

 

We reconstruct the original by placing “Leaves,” as originally conceived, for “Tumbleweeds” and the hand written scrap found on the rear of the O-Bar-O Cowboys’ lyric sheet at the end.

 

Original Intro:

Days may be dreary, still I’m not weary

My heart needs no consoling

At each break of dawn, you’ll find that I’ve gone

Like old leaves, I’m rolling

 

See them tumbling down,

Pledging their love to the ground,

Lonely but free I’ll be found

Drifting along with the tumbling leaves.

 

Cares of the past are behind,

Nowhere to go, but I’ll find

Just where the road will wind,

Drifting along with the tumbling leaves.

 

I know when night has gone

That a new world’s born at dawn.

 

Time keeps rolling along

Why should I care if I’m wrong
Here in my heart is a song,

Drifting along with the tumbling leaves.

 

This is the version first published by Sunset Music on May 25, 1934: “Tumbling Leaves” has been replaced by “Tumbleweeds” because of listener’s requests for the mis-heard lyric.

 

First published intro:

Days may be dreary, still I’m not weary

My heart needs no consoling

At each break of dawn, you’ll find that I’ve gone

Like old tumbleweeds, I’m rolling

 

See them tumbling down,

Pledging their love to the ground,

Lonely but free I’ll be found

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

Cares of the past are behind,

Nowhere to go, but I’ll find

Just where the road will wind,

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

I know when night has gone

That a new world’s born at dawn.

 

I’ll keep rolling along.

Deep in my heart is a song.

Here on the range I belong

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

Bob and his partner canceled their agreement with Sunset Music in favor of one with Sam Fox. The song was re-published on July 11, 1934 but with a new introduction provided by Sam Fox.

 

Revised Intro:

I’m a roaming cowboy, riding all day long

Tumbleweeds around me sing their lonely song.

Nights underneath a prairie moon

I ride along and sing a tune.

 

See them tumbling down,

Pledging their love to the ground,

Lonely but free I’ll be found

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

Cares of the past are behind,

Nowhere to go, but I’ll find

Just where the road will wind,

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

I know when night has gone

That a new world’s born at dawn.

 

I’ll keep rolling along.

Deep in my heart is a song.

Here on the range I belong

Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds.

 

(Originally published in "The Western Way" Spring 2008 Issue. Reproduced here by permission of the copyright holder. Thank you to Dave Bourne, Elizabeth McDonald, Hal Spencer and Laurence Zwisohn for their contributions to this article.)

 


 

OTHER FILMS WHICH FEATURED TUMBLING TUMBLEWEEDS by BOB NOLAN:

1938 10 04 West of the Santa Fe – Columbia / Starrett

1943 07 13 Silver Spurs – Republic / Rogers

1945 01 26 Hollywood Canteen – Warner / Robert Hutton

1945 06 07 Rhythm Roundup – Columbia / Curtis

1945 10 11 Don’t Fence Me In – Republic / Rogers

1945 12 15 Along the Navajo Trail – Republic / Rogers

 

Theme Songs of the Columbia - Starrett series' (except first two). Examples:

1937 Outlaws of the Prairie introduction

1937 Old Wyoming Trail introduction

1938 Cattle Raiders introduction

1938 Rio Grande introduction (most often used intro)

1939 Man from Sundown introduction

 

RECORDINGS BY THE SONS OF THE PIONEERS

1934 08 08 Decca (Tim Spencer vocal)

1934 Standard radio transcription #1729

1937 02 22 Decca (Tim Spencer vocal)

NBC Thesaurus 

1944 10-2-4 Time with introduction by Bob Nolan

1945 10 11 Don’t Fence Me In

1945 12 15 Along the Navajo Trail

1946 03 15 RCA

1946c V disc 787 b (Ken Carson vocal)

1951-53 Lucky U (Lloyd Perryman vocal)

1951-53 Lucky U

1955 Smokey the Bear (Lloyd Perryman vocal) 

1959 06 24 RCA

1968 11 12 RCA (Lloyd Perryman vocal)

1976 05 12 Granite-ATV-Music (Lloyd Perryman vocal) 

1983 02 Silver Spur Recordings

2009 Anniversary

 

RECORDINGS BY BOB NOLAN without the Sons of the Pioneers:

1953 07 03 RCA

1979 Elektra

 

PHOTO GALLERY 

Sunset Music Co.

 

Sunset Music, 1934 plus clipping

Calin Coburn Collection ©2004

 

Sam Fox Publishing Co.

 

Williamson Music Inc.

 

Chords courtesy of Carlos Fiorelli

 

Chords courtesy of Carlos Fiorelli

 

Tune Dex

 

 

TRANSCRIPTIONS

Standard Radio Transcription #1729 (theme)

10-2-4 Ranch / Time

    10-2-4 Ranch Show Date: 12/31/43 (01)
    10-2-4 Time Show Date: 01/02/45 (02)

Teleways Transcriptions: #26-57-102-142-166-194-213-260

Lucky U programs courtesy of Larry Hopper:

    Audition Disc No. 1 and No. 2.
    28 November 1951. Transcription Disc TR-119, 120
    21 August 1952. Transcription Disc TR-485, 486

Smokey the Bear

    1955: Show #4

    1958: Show #1