Home Page

Awards

Biographies

Discography

Feedback

Filmography

Lyrics

Recollections

Reference

Reflections

Slide Shows

Special Features

 

UNC

Videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMAGES OF ARIZONA

February 28, 2011

 

Song: Untitled Navajo song.

Jerome

Tuzigoot Ruins

Montezuma Castle and Well

Oak Creek

Sedona

Elephant Feet

Flagstaff

Navajo National Monument

 

Next page

Home

 

A Word on Land Forms in the Red Rock Canyon Country

The Colorado Plateau is a vast upland covering about 130,000 square miles within western Colorado, northwestern New Mexico, southern and eastern Utah and northern Arizona, including the Mogollon Rim. About 90% is drained by the Colorado River and its main tributaries: the Green, San Juan and Little Colorado Rivers. During eons of erosion, the Plateau has been carved into mesas which in turn have been eroded into buttes, then spires, before they finally disappear. The best place to view all these stages is Monument Valley.

 

Leaving Prescott, Arizona

 

Prescott, Arizona

 

Prescott, Arizona

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

First glimpse of the Verde (pronounced vur-dy) Valley

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona. Overlooking the Verde Valley.

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Jerome, Arizona

(Drake photo)

Jerome, Arizona

 

Jerome, Arizona, overlooking the Verde Valley and Tuzigoot Ruins.

 

Indians were mining Mingus Mountain for its copper when the Spanish arrived in the area more than 300 years ago, but Jerome, the first American town here, was not founded until 1876. For the next 60 years it was assaulted by floods, fires and epidemics but the wealth buried under Mingus Mountain kept the town booming. At its peak, 15,000 people lived here and the mountain - honeycombed with more than 100 miles of mine shafts - endured continuous blasting. Finally, the tormented mountain responded. After a season of abnormally wet weather, a piece of it collapsed in a colossal mudslide that swept away hundreds of structures. A quaint fraction of Jerome, 300 buildings, still hugs the mountainside. Today, Jerome has fewer than 500 citizens.... (p. 231, "Arizona" by Lawrence Cheek)

 

The highway narrows and goes right through town with barely room for two cars to meet between the facing buildings. Certainly no good-sized motor home would be able to meet another vehicle or even navigate some of the curves. On our way down into the valley, we had a good view of the Sinagua ruins at Tuzigoot but we couldn't find a way to get to them until we walked into a tiny bakery-cafe and asked some of the locals.

 

Jerome, Arizona

 

Looking down on Jerome and over the Verde River Valley

 

Jerome, Arizona

 

Jerome, Arizona, built on the side of Mingus Mountain overlooking the Verde Valley.

(Drake Photo)

 

Jerome, Arizona, home of singer / songwriter Katie Lee.

 

Jerome, Arizona

(Drake Photo)

 

Jerome, Arizona, showing the tailings from the Little Daisy Mine with the Little Daisy Hotel above it.

(Drake photo)

 

Little Daisy Hotel (1919), Jerome, Arizona.

 

The Little Daisy Hotel was built by Jimmy Douglas just above his Little Daisy Mine as a dorm for miners. It was recently remodelled as a private residence and only two people live in this 44-room hotel now. (Drake photo)

 

Overlooking the Verde Valley, driving down Mingus Mountain from Jerome

(Drake photo)

 

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot Sinagua ruins, down from Jerome in the Verde Valley and two miles east of Clarkdale, were abandoned by the early 1400s. The original pueblo, excavated in 1933 and 1934, was 2 stories high with 77 ground-floor rooms (110 in all.) Note: "Tuzigoot" is Apache for "crooked water" and is pronounced "Toozy-goot".  "Sinagua" is Spanish for "without water".

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

 

"The Ruins of Tuzigoot: For thousands of years, the Verde Valley has been a human melting pot. Hunters and gatherers came first, searching for wild game and grasses. Traders followed, digging salt and minerals and then settlers farming the fertile bottomlands. A tribe of southern Sinagua built their masonry homes on this ridge about AD 1000 and established a thriving agricultural community. Inexplicable, they left in the early 1400s, more than a hundred years before the first Europeans rode into the valley. A circular 1/4 mile trail winds up and through the remains of the Tuzigoot pueblo. Please stay off the walls and on the walkway. Help us preserve these remnants of an earlier civilization."

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

 

"Pueblo Rooms: You are looking into a typical room built probably in the late 1300s during the final expansion of Tuzigoot. This is one of the seven rooms comprising a unit separated from the main pueblo by a plaza, the grassy area to the left of the ruins. Most rooms in the pueblo sheltered single families and were used mainly for sleeping and eating. Some rooms had stone or clay-lined fireplaces for cooking and warmth but outside fire pits were also used. Trough-style stone metates and two-handed manos for grinding corn were found in the ruins. Sinagua builders used soft, porous limestone for the walls which required constant repair. This is still a concern today and most pueblo rooms have been stabilized. A few of the original interior walls are still intact.

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

 

"Minerals in the Mountains: The colorful outcrops on Mingus Mountain in front of you yielded copper ore, argillite, and malachite and azurite (for paints and coloring) used by prehistoric people for trade goods or ornaments. Long after the Sinagua abandoned this pueblo, mining companies arrived to extract ore from some of the richest copper deposits in the world: Jerome, the town built for the miners, is visible on the upper mountain slopes. The process of extracting copper included crushing the ore, mixing it with water to form a slurry, and then removing the metal. The slurry residue (tailings) was pumped into the lowlands, forming the orange expanse below you. The area is periodically flooded to control dust."

 

 

(Drake photo)

 

"In contrast to the rugged northern mountains and harsh southern desert, the Verde Valley must have seemed a paradise to the people who settled here around AD 700. Antelope, deer and small game were plentiful and grasslands above the river supplied mesquite beans, wild legumes, grape and amaranth seeds. Through the valley flowed the Verde River where fish and turtles could be caught: mallards and Canadian geese alighted, attracted by the water and wild grains. Dry farming - using available rainfall - provided some crops on the foothills, and streams were diverted for irrigating lowland farms. Early dwellings were pit houses dug beside the river, but succeeding generations moved into caves or rooms hollowed form cliffs; many built masonry homes on the ridges. By AD 1300, there were about 50 major pueblo sites, many surrounded by smaller satellite pueblos, in the middle of Verde Valley."

 

Ruins by the river -

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

"Late Pueblo Architecture: The pueblo at Tuzigoot grew slowly over a 400-year period, beginning first with a series of small rooms in the center of the hilltop. Apparently, there was no overall plan and rooms were added as the population increased. The pueblo extended about 500 feet long on a north-south axis along the ridge top with the main section about 100 feet wide. Limestone and sandstone deposits from the ridge provided the building materials for the walls, while juniper, pine and cottonwood trees were hauled up the hillsides for roof support posts. In time0honored fashion, new room were built on the ruins of old ones. Entry to most rooms was by way of ladders through roof top hatches and the contiguous design was a good example of prehistoric thermal efficiency. At its most productive time - the late 1300s - the Tuzigoot pueblo contained 86 ground floor rooms and, possible, 15 second story rooms, with about 225 people living here."

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

The inside of the pueblo showing the ceiling of saguaro spines.

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument - the stone and mud construction

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument - a view from the top.

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

Sitting in warm sun for the first time this year.

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Tuzigoot National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

 

"The Mystery of Their Leaving: Much of life in the Tuzigoot pueblo remains a puzzle to us, but the largest missing piece is what happened after 1400? Why did the Sinagua - successful builders and farmers - leave the beautiful Verde Valley? Did the rains stop for a few years or diseases strike them? Were there internal conflicts? For over 400 years the Sinagua survived, yet we do not know what became of them. No separate Sinagua tribe exists today."

 

 

Montezuma Castle

Montezuma Castle, 5-story, 20-room dwelling built by the Sinagua in the 1100s in a cliff recess 100 feet above the valley. Assuming it was Aztec in origin, the early settlers misnamed it "Montezuma Castle". The ruins are 50 miles south of Flagstaff, off I-17 via US Alt 89 in the Oak Creek Canyon. My brother and his wife first visited Montezuma castle 40 years ago on their honeymoon. Camp Verde, an army post established in 1864 to wage war against the Apaches, lies 5 miles south of the ruins. Camp Verde also served as the starting point for the old military road that ran to the east along the Mogollon Rim to Fort Apache.

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake camera)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle - Beaver Creek

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle - Beaver Creek

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

Was this another family cave?

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

 

"Soaptree Yucca (yucca elata): Narrow-leaf yuccas are frequently confused with century plant, sotol and beargrass, but can be identified by the fibres protruding from the leaf margins. This yucca is co-dependent with a moth species: the moth is the only means for the yucca to pollinate; only this yucca provides protection and food for the moth egg larvae in its blossoms. Spaniards called the plat, "our Lord's candle," for the spreading plume of cream-white flowers that seem to glow in the night from May through July. "Soaptree" comes from a lathery suds obtained from the roots. It was used as a shampoo, wool detergent, and made into a vegetable soap. The Sinagua ate the petals, young flower stalks and the lower parts of the stems."

 

Montezuma Castle

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

The Canon searched for and found honeycomb in a recess in the rock.

(Drake photo)

 

Montezuma Castle

 

"Related to the plane tree, sycamores thrive in several parts of the United States. The Arizona sycamore even extends into Mexico. A large, spreading tree with lovely arched, white-barked branches, the sycamore's striking features include a mottled bark; large, maple-like leaves; and swinging 'buttonballs' (seed balls). It provides much-needed shade near desert streams and ponds, cooling the water and slowing evaporation. Seasoned sycamores remain strong over time; beams made from the tree still support ceilings in Montezuma Castle after 700 years."

 

Oak Creek

 

Oak Creek country

 

On the way to Sedona

 

On the way to Sedona

 

On the way to Sedona

 

Red Rock Ranger Station

 

Red Rock Ranger Station

 

Red Rock Ranger Station

(You can see Sedona's Bell Rock in the centre distance.)

 

Red Rock Ranger Station

(Drake photo)

 

Red Rock Ranger Station

(Drake photo)

 

Red Rock Ranger Station

(Drake photo)

 

Sedona

Greater Sedona has a population of approximately 9,000 and includes five communities - "Uptown" near the mouth of Oak Creek; West Sedona, Red Rock, Little Horse Park and the Village of Oak Creek lying in Big Park, about 7 miles from "Uptown".

 

Bell Rock, Sedona, rises about 550 feet above the surrounding terrain. Summit elevation: 4,919 feet above sea level.

(Drake photo)

 

Between Uptown and West Sedona

(Drake photo)

 

Cathedral Rock, once known as Courthouse Rock

(Drake photo)

 

Cathedral Rock

(Drake photo)

 

Between Uptown and West Sedona

(Drake photo)

 

W W Midgley Bridge (named for a senator) over Wilson Canyon, about 1 1/2 miles north of "Uptown", Sedona.

Wilson Canyon is a side gorge of the lower Oak Creek Canyon

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing West Sedona

 

Sedona - Bell Rock in the centre and Courthouse Butte to the right.

 

Bell Rock, Sedona

 

The town got its name in 1902 when the first post office was named "Sedona" after the postmaster's wife, Sedona Schnebly.

 

Sedona

 

Sedona

The shape and color of the buildings have been chosen to blend into the landscape.

 

Sedona

 

Sedona

 

On the way to Flagstaff through the Coconino Forest Preserve

 

Coconino Forest Preserve

 

Coconino Forest Preserve

 

Coconino Forest Preserve

 

Flagstaff, Arizona

 

Flagstaff, Arizona

 

Flagstaff, Arizona

 

Wupatki National Monument

 

 

 

(Drake photo)

 

 

 

 

The Painted Desert in the far off distance

 

 

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

The bridge over the Little Colorado at the Cameron Trading Post

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

The native rock was strange, like a roughly-made concrete.

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

(Drake photo)

 

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

(Drake photo)

 

The Painted Desert coming into view. The ground here is red, dotted with clumps of green grass. Unreal. Surreal.

 

 

(Drake photo)

 

Elephant Feet

 

North of Tuba City, 2 miles northeast of Tonalea near Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navajo National Monument

 

A National Monument in the United States is a protected area that is similar to a National Park except that the President of the United States can quickly declare an area of the United States to be a National Monument without the approval of Congress. National monuments receive less funding and afford fewer protections to wildlife than national parks. However, areas within and extending beyond national parks, monuments, and national forests can be part of wilderness areas, which have an even greater degree of protection than a national park would alone, although wilderness areas managed by the United States Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management often allow hunting. National monuments can be managed by one of several federal agencies: the National Park Service, United States Forest Service, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, or Bureau of Land Management. The power to grant national monuments comes from the Antiquities Act of 1906. President Theodore Roosevelt used the act to declare Devils Tower in Wyoming as the first national monument. He thought Congress was moving too slowly and it would be ruined by the time they made it a national park. (Wikipedia)

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation.

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation.

 

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation. This drive was so beautiful for miles and miles that it was almost enough in itself without going farther. We met only one other vehicle on the road. The slanting sun began to intensify the red in the sand.

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation.

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation.

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation.

 

On the back road to Navajo National Monument, through the reservation.

 

Navajo National Monument

 

We arrived at the Navajo National Monument at 5:30, just half an hour too late. It was too cold to hang around long and the light was going so we decided spend the night in Kayenta and come back in the morning.

 

Navajo National Monument

 

Navajo National Monument

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Betatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

 

Navajo National Monument

It looks like sand but it's solid rock.

(Drake photo)

 

Next page