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IMAGES OF ARIZONA

March 1, 2011

 

Song: Untitled Navajo song.

•  Agatha Peak

•  Bétatakin Ruins

•  Black Stallion

•  Bluff, Utah

•  Canyon de Chelly (map)

•  Goosenecks

•  Mexican Hat, Utah (map)

•  Monument Valley (map)

•  Owl Rock "King Tut"

•  Spider Rock

•  White House in Between

•  Next page

•  Home

 

About 8:00 am we headed back to Navajo National Monument to get a better view of Bétatakin Ruin - cliff dwellings - and to walk down the beautifully kept trail. There was only one other man there so we had the trail to ourselves. M had P step onto a patch of virgin snow then off again. He photographed the footprints and called it "Cougar Tracks". Only the birds made more noise than we did. I took some pix but mainly a whole disk of video. We could have hired a Jeep and taken the 17 mile trip to Keet Seel Ruin but we thought we were happy with what we'd seen already. Then, by 11:00 a. m., we were on the road again.

 

Navajo National Monument

Back from Kayenta to the Navajo Monument for a better look.

 

From Kayenta to the Navajo Monument.

 

From Kayenta to the Navajo Monument.

 

From Kayenta to the Navajo Monument.

 

From Kayenta to the Navajo Monument.

 

Navajo National Monument.

 

Navajo National Monument.

From level ground, you are unaware of the huge chasm, Tsegi Canyon, a few feet away.

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake Photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake Photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

 

Navajo National Monument.

 

(Drake photo)

 

"Dinosaur Footprint: Footprints of a small dinosaur that walked on his hind legs. About 180 million years ago, he left a lasting signature by walking through the mud. The print then filled with sediment, and both print and cast (upside-down here) eventually turned to stone. Tracks of these three-toed Jurassic reptiles are very common in the limestone formations of the Navajo Country."

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

Mistletoe, life-strangling parasite on the juniper

 

Navajo National Monument.

 

"Follow this easy one-mile (1.6 km) round-trip trail to a point overlooking Bétatakin Ruin - multi-level cliff-village home to a community of 13th century Anasazi farmers. On the way there and back, you'll be walking through pygmy forest - a complex community of plants and animals that dominated the high, semi-arid plateaus of the American Southwest. Watch in particular for dwarfed, gnarled pinyon (pińon) and juniper trees "posing" in photogenic postures and configurations - leaning at odd angles, sprouting peculiar limb-growths, bearing tangles of exposed roots, and appearing to try to crowd each other out."

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

 

Pinyon Pine (or Pińon) are small but very old. Trees with a diameter of 6-10 inches are often 150 years old and some with only slightly larger diameters may be 250 to 350 years old.

 

 

"Pinyon Pine (Pinus edulis): The nut of this little tree, eaten raw or roasted, is a favorite wild food of the Southwestern Indians. Prehistoric Indians used the pitch to taste stone arrowheads and knives to wooden shafts and handles, and to repair broken pots. Navajos waterproof baskets with it. Pitch can also be chewed as gum, if it is hard enough when removed from the tree."

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

A kiva

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument: Cougar tracks in the snow J

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument.

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

"Utah Juniper: This tree had many uses. Many of the roof beams in Bétatakin are juniper. Fires were started with juniper fire-drills, the shredded bark was used for tinder, and the wood was used for fuel. The shredded bark also served as diaper pads, was braided into rope, and was coiled into rings to support pottery jars. A brew from the leaves was used by the Hopis as a laxative and in times of want the berries were eaten."

 

Bétatakin Ruins (Talastima: Place of the Blue Corn Tassels) of the Tsegi Canyon

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

"Bétatakin" is the Navajo word for "house on the ledge"; "Anasazi" is Navajo for "ancient ones".

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

"Alcove Dimensions: 452 feet (140m) high, 370 feet (113m) wide, 135 feet (41m) deep."

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

 

Bétatakin Ruin alcove, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

To the right of Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

We took far too many pictures but the sight was so amazing that we wanted to be certain that one of them would turn out.

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

"Prehistoric Pioneers: This is the Place. The ancestral Puebloans often chose south-facing alcoves like this one for their cliff villages; here are all the basic necessities of life. Benefits of winter sun and summer shade, shelter from the elements, and spring water for drinking and cooking are inside. Nearby are animals to hunt, plants to gather and open streamside lands to farm.

 

"Wilderness Skills. The puebloans grew cotton, using dry-land and irrigated farming techniques; the climate then was much like today. They domesticated turkeys and dogs. They used everything the land provided; pinyon pine, prickly pear cactus, rice grass, and sunflowers. Archaeologists discovered the remains of 400 different plants in Talastima/Bétatakin - the people knew this land well.

 

"Why Did The Leave? Tree-ring dating shows that a 20-year drought ended about 1300. For farmers who had a close relationship with rain and the land, this was a message. It was time to move on, continuing their life journey: the migration to find the spiritual center of the world. The people left this place intact, storing food and supplies for their future return. Hopi oral history says this sacred site is not abandoned; the builders are still here with us."

 

(Drake photo)

 

"Into the Memory. Who was Here? Descendants of the Hopi people who built this place call it Talastima, a Hopi word for "Place of the Blue Corn Tassels." They call their ancient relatives "Hisatsinom." Zuni, also pueblo builders, know that several of their clans began in this area. Later, San Juan Southern Paiute, famous for their baskets, moved into this area and lived near the cliff dwellings. "Bétatakin" is a Navajo - or, Diné, as they call themselves - word, meaning House on a Ledge. Today this place is surrounded by the Navajo Nation, as it has been for hundreds of years.

 

"Other Sources. The Ancestral Puebloans were great traders. Here they made excellent ceramic pottery for trade. Rocks from elsewhere were used for grinding stones, tools, or arrowheads. They traded for turquoise, shell, parrots, and macaws. You can admire some of their carefully worked pottery inside the visitor center."

 

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

"Voices in the Canon. By 1286, Bétatakin village had grown to fill even the most precarious shelves and niches in the alcove, and housed 100 to 125 people clustered into 20-25 households. Looking down at this sheltered site today you can still see most remnants of the village's original 135 rooms, built of stone, wood, and clay. It's clear that the Tsegi Canyon farmers came to stay and built to last. Like their Pueblo neighbours in the Mesa Verde and Chaco regions, Tsegi farmers raised corn, beans, and squash, and supplemented their diets by hunting and plant-gathering. Their material legacy embraces a surprising diversity. They fashioned objects of utility and beauty from the wood, clay, bone, stone, and fibers that lay close at hand. They cultivated an impressive, intimate knowledge of the plants, animals, and cycles of the land."

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Bétatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

The narrow trail was paved and painted ochre to match the native rock. I took a whole mini DVD of the trail but, sadly, it will play only on my camcorder.

 

 

On the road again....

 

Leaving Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Leaving Navajo National Monument

A Black Stallion for Bryce

(Drake photo)

 

Leaving Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Leaving Navajo National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Owl Rock on left, Agatha (aka Agathla) Peak (El Capitan) on the right. Nearing Monument Valley.

 

Nearing Monument Valley.

Agatha Peak (aka Agathla) from another angle

 

Nearing Monument Valley.

 

Nearing Agatha (aka Agathla)  Peak, an ancient volcanic core

 

Agatha (aka Agathla) Peak: It is said by the Navajos that she is a story teller mother with her children sitting around her feet in rapt attention.

 

Agatha (aka Agathla) Peak, nearing Monument Valley.

 

Agatha (aka Agathla) Peak, nearing Monument Valley.

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Monument Valley: Owl Rock

 

Owl Rock, red rock monument reminding us of King Tutankhamen or some ancient Pharaoh.

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Monument Valley: Owl Rock

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Monument Valley: Owl Rock

(Drake photo)

 

 

Note: Entering Monument Valley. We had no guide to names of the buttes, mesas and spires so I'm sure I have misnamed some of them. My only guide was the photos others left on the Internet.

 

Entering Monument Valley

 

Entering Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

For all the world like chocolate frosting....

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley (elevation 5,500 feet)

 

Monument Valley through tumbleweeds

 

Monument Valley through tumbleweeds

 

Monument Valley

 

View of the Stagecoach, Bear & Rabbit, Castle Butte and the Big Indian (and ? Mesa), Monument Valley

 

Left to right: Castle Butte, Big Indian, ? Mesa, East and West Mittens, Merrick Butte, Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley: The Mittens in centre left, Merrick Butte nearer right

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

 

Left to right: Stagecoach, Bear and Rabbit, Castle Butte and the Big Indian in Monument Valley

 

Sentinel Mesa, Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Navajo home in Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley: left is Merrick Butte

 

Monument Valley: Merrick Butte on the right. I never did find the name of the mesa to the left - Mitchell Mesa? Sentinel Mesa?

(Drake photo)

 

Merrick Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

View of the Stagecoach, Bear & Rabbit, Castle Butte and the Big Indian, (and ? Mesa), Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Castle Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Merrick Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

The Big Indian (aka Big Chief), Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

View of the Stagecoach, Bear & Rabbit, Castle Butte and the Big Indian, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Castle Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Merrick Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

(Drake photo)

 

Merrick Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Merrick Butte, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

View of the Stagecoach, Bear & Rabbit, Castle Butte and the Big Indian, Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Monument Valley

(Drake photo)

 

Perfect for the yard - tempting, but just too heavy

(Drake photo)

 

And now we ducked into Utah....

 

The Painted Desert, Utah

 

San Juan Trading Post, Mexican Hat, Utah

 

The Painted Desert near Bluff, Utah

 

Cows at last in Utah I was expecting to see cattle and sheep but there were few by the roadside.

 

Utah

 

Utah

 

Utah

 

Utah

 

Utah

 

Utah

 

Utah

 

Bluff, Utah

Bluff was interesting because of the lady proprietor (who M nicknamed Drusilla) of a cafe / motel / Navajo sales shop called Cottonwood RV Park / Bluff Motors - Parts. Her name was actually Faye Belle, an elderly lady now but with that facial bone structure that is always beautiful. She had a grubby cafe and the menu posted on the wall was so atrocious it was hilarious. $11.50 for two eggs (any way) + hash browns and toast. $11.40 for the same order with one egg. Hot cereal was $5.50 and so was cold cereal. Coffee was posted at $1.60 but Milton paid $1.80 a cup for us. She sold Indian crafts and was very knowledgeable about the weavers and where the turquoise came from, etc. Prices were high but not, we later discovered, inordinately so. We were there quite awhile because M was recharging his camera battery so we got to know each other quite well. M, not wishing to leave without purchasing something, bought two large pictures of the Goosenecks Country and gave one to me! Wow!

 

 

We stopped for a couple of hours in Bluff, Utah, so my brother could charge the battery for his camera before we went on.

 

Bluff, Utah

 

Bluff, Utah

 

Nearing Mexican Hat, Utah

 

Mexican Hat, Utah

 

Utah

 

Nearing Mexican Hat, Utah

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Mexican Hat, Utah! The sand hills were that lovely variegated pastel layered combo of blue-gray, pink and light gray – like sand art.

(Drake photo)

 

Nearing Mexican Hat, Utah

(Drake photo)

 

Mexican Hat Rock, Utah

(Drake photo)

 

Mexican Hat Rock, Utah

(Drake photo)

 

Mexican Hat Rock, Utah

(Drake photo)

 

Alhambra Rock

northern side of Rt. 163, west of Mexican Hat, San Juan County, southeastern Utah

(Drake photo)

 

 

Great Goosenecks of the San Juan River

 

Goosenecks State Park

 

Goosenecks State Park

 

 

Four miles off Utah Highway 261 near Mexican Hat, you can look into a 1,000-foot-deep chasm carved through the Pennsylvanian Hermosa Formation by the silt-laden San Juan River. The river meanders back and forth, flowing for more than five miles while progressing only one linear mile toward the Colorado River and Lake Powell.

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

Great Goosenecks of the San Juan

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

 

 

"Geology: approximately 1,000 feet beneath the spot where you now stand winds the San Juan River. Originating in Colorado, this river eventually joins Lake Powell. The silt-laden San Juan has been instrumental in cutting the deep bending chasm directly below. This section is called the Great Goosenecks of the San Juan River. Geologists consider this part of the river to be one of the finest examples of 'entrenched meanders' anywhere in the world. The meandering pattern originated several million years ago when the river was flowing on a relatively flat plain, much as the present-day Mississippi River. The San Juan became entrenched when the entire Colorado Plateau was slowly uplifted. Cutting downward, the river followed its initial pattern and thus created the canyon you now view. The process continues to this day as the San Juan River cuts ever deeper into prehistoric geological formations.

 

"Wildlife: Animal life is limited, primarily because of arid conditions which restrict vegetative growth. The most usual forms are jackrabbit and cottontail rabbit, skink, desert rodents, and various reptiles. Occasionally seen are such predators is the bobcat, coyote and grey fox. Bird life, although not abundant, includes the golden eagle, raven, red-tailed hawk, horned lark, swallow and various migratory birds.

 

Elevation: 4,971 feet

Annual precipitation: 6.3 inches

Average high temperature: 87.6F

Extreme high temperature: 109.0F

Average low temperature: 9.5F

Extreme low temperature: -4.0F

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

(Drake photo)

 

Goosenecks State Park, Utah

(Drake Photo)

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

(Drake photo)

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

(Drake photo)

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

From Bluff to Canyon de Chelly somewhere

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

Canyon de Chelly (pronounced "d'shay")

 

(Drake photo)

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument was established on April 1, 1931 as a unit of the National Park Service. It is located in northeastern Arizona within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation. It preserves ruins of the early indigenous tribes that lived in the area, including the Ancient Pueblo Peoples (also called Anasazi) and Navajo. The monument covers 131 square miles (339 km2) and encompasses the floors and rims of the three major canyons: de Chelly, del Muerto, and Monument. These canyons were cut by streams with headwaters in the Chuska mountains just to the east of the monument.

 

Humans have occupied Canyon de Chelly for almost 2,000 years. The ancestral Puebloans [Anasazi] left about 400 ruins beginning with pit houses and ending with three-story houses around AD 1284. They left thousands of paintings on the canyon walls and when the Navajo successors began to move into the canyons in the mid 1700s, they added their own pictographs or pictorial histories.

The name de Chelly is a Spanish borrowing of the Navajo word "Tséyi" or "Tsegi" (I saw both spellings), which means "canyon". The Navajo pronunciation is "tsé-ee". The Spanish pronunciation of de Chelly [de-tche-yi] was adapted into English pronunciation as "də·shā′ or "d'shay"
 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument - the canyon floor

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

"Tseyi" pronounced "Shay" as in "Cańon de Chelly"

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

 

"Anasazi - the Ancient Ones: Today this beautiful canyon is much as it was when the first settlers appeared - prehistoric Indians called Anasazi - a Navajo word meaning 'Ancient Ones'. Perhaps they were so named because the Navajo found only their villages - vacant and crumbling. Shallow, dry alcoves - such as you see in the far canyon wall - provided sheltered building sites for the Anasazi. Their first dwellings were pit-houses, dug in the ground and roofed with poles, grass and earth. Later they built many-roomed structures of stone and mud mortar. Ruins of two Anasazi villages built more than 700 years ago are visible from here: First Ruin to the left, and Junction Ruin to the right (named by the first archaeological expedition into the canyon).

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

 

"White House in Between: Do you see the whitewashed walls of the central room in the upper level of this prehistoric Anasazi village? The Navajo mention these ruins in their Night Chant, calling them Kínií' Na'ígaí - White House in Between - because of this unique coloring. At its zenith, the village housed about 100 men, women and children in some 60 rooms constructed of stone blocks with mud mortar. The Anasazi people who lived here farmed the canyon floor, raising corn, beans, squash and cotton. They made fine cloth of cotton, robes of turkey feathers, baskets and sandals of yucca. They also produced pottery with elaborate decorations. The artist's interpretation shows White House as it might have appeared about AD 1160."

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

White House in Between

 

White House in Between

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

White House in Between

(Drake photo)

 

White House in Between (upper)

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

White House in Between

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

White House in Between (lower)

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

White House in Between (lower)

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

 

It was getting dark now and cold. We elected to stay in the car and watch the sun set while my brother took the trail down to see the Spider Rock. I wish now I had gone.

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rock

(Drake photo)

 

Spider Rock, a sandstone spire that rises 832 feet (240 m) from the canyon floor at the junction of Canyon de Chelly and Monument Canyon but this overlook was 200 feet higher than that so my brother was looking down on it. Spider Rock can be seen from South Rim Drive. It has served as the scene of a number of television commercials. According to traditional Navajo beliefs the taller of the two spires is the home of Spider Woman or Spider Grandmother, creator of the world. She was responsible for the stars in the sky. She took a web she had spun and laced it with dew then threw it into the sky. The dew became the stars.

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rocks

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rocks

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rocks

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rocks

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rock Overlook

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rock Overlook

(Drake photo)

 

South Rim of the Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Spider Rock Overlook

(Drake photo)

 

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